J-FEST Summer 2017

Date

From 15 July 2017 to 16 July 2017

Schedule

12:00–23:00

Place

Garage Square in front of the Museum
J-FEST Summer 2017J-FEST Summer 2017

DESCRIPTION

Japanese culture festival J-FEST will be held in collaboration with Garage Museum of Contemporary Art.

The Japanese culture festival J-FEST will be held on July 15 and 16, 2017 in a new open-air format at Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Gorky Park. Visitors of all ages will get a unique opportunity to dive into the world of Japanese traditional culture.

J-FEST Summer 2017 is a variation on the traditional summer festival Natsu Matsuri. In ancient times, such festivals were held to thank the gods for the good health and well-being of the people. Now festivals are held throughout Japan from July to August. The celebration includes decoration of the streets with traditional lanterns and the traditional dance Bon Odori.

Visitors will get a chance to experience the atmosphere of Natsu Matsuri, discover the art of ikebana, origami, and calligraphy, try the traditional games Go and Shogi, become acquainted with Japanese cuisine, and participate in the tea ceremony. 

Lectures on Japanese art and cinema, as well as on Ittiko Kubota kimonos will be held at Garage open-air cinema. The sports area of the festival will bring together different schools and styles of Japanese martial arts, including: aikido, judo, karate, nijutsu (art of ninja), and many others. The festival will feature Yusuke Ito, master of the Kendama cup-and-ball, twice listed in Guinness World Records, as well as Mao Aska, master of traditional Japanese dance, who will teach visitors the art of Bon Odori. The world-famous Japanese drummers ASKA-GUMI will be the special guests of J-Fest.

J-FEST is initiated by Russian and Japanese companies with the support of the Embassy of Japan and annually welcomes a wide audience and introduces it to Japanese culture. In 2017, the festival is held in collaboration with Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in the run up to the first large-scale exhibition by famous Japanese artist Takashi Murakami, which opens at Garage on September 29, 2017. Consisting of five sections that each explore a particular phenomenon in Japanese culture that has been formally or semantically examined by Murakami, the show reveals the artist’s inquiries into the nuanced facets of Japanese culture and public consciousness, blurring the line between high and low culture, while merging various media into one continuous flow of images. Presenting paintings, drawings, and films by Murakami from public and private collections, the exhibition will also feature eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Japanese engravings and paintings from the collections of the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow. Developed in close collaboration with the artist, the project includes a number of new works, thus transforming the entire Museum into a total Murakami universe.


The organizing committee of J-FEST 2017: Embassy of Japan in the Russian Federation (Chairman), Center of Japanese culture J-FEST (the Secretariat), Hakuhodo Rus and Japan Art Rainbow. General Sponsor: International Chodiev Foundation. The festival is held in collaboration with Garage Museum of Contemporary Art with the support of Gorky Park.

Official website: j-fest.org

GENERAL SPONSOR OF THE FESTIVAL

International Chodiev Foundation was founded by the businessman and philantropist, Dr. of Political Sciences, Patokh Chodiev in 1996. Its main goal is to promote academic excellence, creativity, and innovation in Eurasia and Southeast Asia.

For more than twenty years, the International Chodiev Foundation has helped to establish connections with international non-governmental organizations, contributed to the conservation of the intellectual potential of Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO), expanded forms of interacademic collaboration, stimulated complex research and supported the most talented young researches.

Main areas of foundation activity:

– Support of MGIMO;
– Development of Russian-Japanese relations;
– Helping children

how to take part

Free Admission

J-FEST Summer 2017 might change location of events if the weather lets us down.
Please check for updates at the information desks.

Schedule

Festival opening ceremony. Traditional Japanese bon odori dance.

Bon odori is a traditional Japanese dance with a 600-year-old history. It is usually performed during the festival of Obon held in July and August. The Bon odori dance which is performed in colorful kimonos by the light of lanterns, will immerse the visitors into the unique atmosphere of an authentic Japanese summer celebration.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
12:15–13:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Screening of Award-winning works from Japan Media Arts Festival  

The annual Japan Media Arts Festival incorporates a diverse range of contemporary visual practices, from animation and comics to media art and games. The screening of award-winning short films, organized by the Agency for Cultural Affairs of Ministry Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, showcases an overview of the newest trends in media-art, focusing on the works of a new generation.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
12:00–13:00
Place
Garage Auditorium

Temari workshop, embroidery technique for hand balls

It is believed that temari evolved from kemari balls that were used in a soccer-like game, which had come to Japan from China in the eighth century. Originally kemari balls were used by male aristocrats, but noble ladies came up with their own version of the game that required using hands rather than legs, and started making balls adorned with fancy embroidery.

The temari history in Russia dates back to about twenty years ago when the first enthusiasts started learning embroidery secrets from the foreign sources. In 2006, they launched a first Russian-language website that still serves as a source of valuable information on temari techniques and history. 

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
12:00–13:30
Place
Garage Atrium

Manga workshop by Japan House

Japanese manga characters from comics and anime with their big expressive eyes, distinctive facial expressions and gestures are recognized and loved thoughout the world. Learning to draw manga is not too difficult, especially under the careful guidance of a professional like Tetsuya Ishii —a teacher from the art school "Anime and Manga" in Tokyo. Tetsuya Ishii's classes are easy to follow and fun!

Participants of the workshop will learn basic techniques of drawing anime heroes and, of course, will create their own character.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
12:00–13:30
Place
Garage Kids' Studio

Master classes in martial arts by “Kateda Ryu Shinobi no Jutsu”

Master classes led by the instructors of the Russian ninja school “Kateda Ryu Shinobi no jutsu” provide a unique opportunity to learn about varous martial arts techniques and weapons including rare ones, such as the ninja sword, unarmed combat (kempo karate), ninpo taijutsu, yawara stick, nunchaku-con,  hon bo, manjito, Japanese blowgun (fukiya), and Japanese small bow (fago hankyu).

The "Kateda" School organizes sports events, seminars, belt and dan certifications; and participates actively in joint Russian-Japanese projects. The school, its coaches and students are winners and laureates of various competitions throughout Moscow and Russia.

REGISTRATION

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
12:00–15:30
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Go game

Both young and adult festival visitors will enjoy trying their hand at Go—one of the most widespread and ancient board games on Earth. The game requires two players, one playing with black stones, and the other with white. The ultimate goal of Go is to surround a bigger territory on the board than your opponent. The teachers from Sente Go school—top children’s educational centre in Russia and Europe—will help participants to grasp the secrets of the game. The head of the school, Aleksey Kozhunkov, is known for training multiple national and European champions in Go.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
12:00–16:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Dancing for everyone by Just Dance

Just Dance is the world’s most popular series of dancing videogames and an exciting way to warm up at a fun get-together. You can try the most recent version of the game—Just Dance 2017—at the Just Dance Russia team stand. Members of team have visited many festivals, including Geek Picnic and IgroMir, enthralling the visitors with their amazing dancing vibe. In the Just Dance game you have to repeat movements after a professional dancer on the screen, and in a couple of sets of warm ups you will feel like a real dancing star. After the warm up, it is time to challenge the other guests at the festival. The game closely monitors participants’ movements to work out the winner of the game.

The Just Dance Russia team includes the founder of the biggest Russian-speaking game community, two champions of the Russian Just Dance competition of 2014 and 2016, along with devoted fans of Just Dance, and they all will be thrilled to tell you more about the game.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
12:00–19:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Kendama game by Belka kendama team

Throughout the day, members of the first Russian open community of kendama players—Belka kendama team—will be demonstrating and teaching the secrets of the game. They are convinced that not only does kendama develop agility and coordination, but it also stimulates brain development, and helps players to find new friends all over the world!

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
12:00–19:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Origami, Japanese language and manga workshops by Mirai Cultural Centre

Experts from the Mirai Japanese Cultural Centre will introduce visitors to the basics of origami, Japanese language, and manga comics drawing using their own specially developed techniques.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
12:00–19:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

The Mahjong Japanese game

Many of us are familiar with the game mahjong through its simplified computer edition. However, its “analog” version is way more interesting! Mahjong is a four-player board game that requires persistence, logical thinking and, of course, an overwhelming desire to win! Mahjong originated in China. At the beginning of the twentieth century it got picked up in Japan and was played by the Chinese rules until Japanese version of game, which is known as Riichi, was developed. Festival visitors can learn the Riichi rules and try their hand at it, while skilled players will get an opportunity to improve their skills in a company of Moscow Riichi mahjong club players.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
12:00–20:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Kendama game workshop by Yusuke Ito

Yusuke Ito is Japan's first professional kendama player. Similar to the Western bilboquet or cup-and-ball, kendama is a traditional Japanese wooden toy that has three cups, a spike, and a ball attached to its handle with a string. Players need to catch the ball into one of the cups or onto the spike—and although it might seem easy, kendama requires a lot of skill!

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
13:10–14:10
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Workshop “Monster transformations with Cardbordia personages”

In the mobile laboratory of Cardboardia's Ministry of Silly Ideas, visitors to the festival will learn something new about themselves. The scientists from the most advanced cardboard research institutes will not hesitate to experiment with the subconscious of their random subjects, namely, the guests of the festival. With this in mind, a special monstrous machine has been devised. It can detect the weird creatures that are concealed in every human being. During the day, the participants will learn all about their Japanese alter egos and will be able to transform into a monster from Japanese mythology to become a part of a large-scale loud costume parade through the festival and Gorky Park.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
13:30–18:30
Place
Garage Screen summer cinema

Screening of the documentary film The Will of the Master devoted to the textile art of Itchiku Kubotu.

Itchiku Kubotu is considered to be the one and only “impressionist” working in textiles; his 104-unique hand-made kimonos essentially expanding the boundaries of textile art. The film creates an overview of the master’s life and his most important works, with interviews with leading experts in Japanese culture, and memories of people who personally knew Kubota and his apprentices. His artistic career started after the end of the Second World War: in 1945, he was held in a Soviet internment camp in Siberia as a prisoner of war. Trapped in a foreign and far-away country, Kubota learned to see the beauty in the things that seemed to promise only rough challenges.

Existing in his own imaginary artistic world, Itchiku Kubota attempted to unravel the secrets of old Japanese masters and managed to uncover the “tsujigahana” fabric dyeing technique. Later it became foundational for his atelier. Contemplating the origin of the Universe and its mysteries, he created a series of paintings on several dozen magnificent kimonos. Their striking bright colors on subtle black or white background intensify the perception of an intricate texture of a textile painting, submerging the viewers into the elated contemplation of beauty. This series of kimonos manifested the climax of Itchiku Kubotu’s work.

After the death of artist in 2003 the Itchiku Kubota Museum was experiencing difficulties; its collection was about to be sold piece by piece in auctions around the world. Then the Russian art patron Patokh Chodiev bought the entire collection and presented it to Japan.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
13:45–15:00
Place
Garage Auditorium

Ikebana workshop (Ikenobō)

Ikebana is one of the most beautiful national traditions of Japan.

Workshop participants will be able to discover a unique art of creating flower arrangements and learn about the distinct traits of Ikenobō, the first school of ikebana.

The workshop is led by the President and Professor of the CIS and Russian branch of the Ikenobō Institute, Tatiana Kuzmina, and Professor of the CIS and Russian branch of the Ikenobō Institute, Larisa Rumyantseva.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
14:00–15:30
Place
Garage Atrium

Traditional Japanese bon odori dance

Bon odori is a traditional Japanese dance with a 600-year-old history. It is usually performed during the festival of Obon held in July and August. The Bon odori dance which is performed in colorful kimonos by the light of lanterns, will immerse visitors into the unique atmosphere of an authentic Japanese summer celebration.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
14:30–15:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Chawan making workshop

A chawan is a special bowl designed for the famous Japanese tea ceremony. Making a chawan is a complicated multistep ritual that takes years to master. During the tea ceremony, the chawan is used for preparing—whipping—powdered green tea (matcha). This process determines the shape, form, size and, generally, the very essence of a tea bowl.

During the workshop, educator Irina Vershinina will explain the differences between the tea bowl and other types of tea-wear, and the essentials that one needs to know before making such bowl. Finally, following detailed instructions, each participant will be able to try and create their own tea bowl.

Please be aware that this workshop is aimed at experienced participants who have previously worked with clay. 

REGISTRATION

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
14:30–16:30
Place
Garage Kids' Studio

АSКА GUMI drumming workshop

Watching the world famous ASKA-GUMI drummers, expertly performing complicated rhythms on large drums while gracefully dancing around the stage, is truly mesmerizing. J-FEST Summer 2017 visitors will have a unique opportunity to try this for themselves. Members of the band—that has already become iconic in Japan—will happily tell visitors about the secrets of their art and let them try the drums.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
15:30–16:15
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Lecture “Japanese ninja phenomenon—from century to century”

The phenomenon of ninjutsu appeared in Japan as the result of assimilation of immigrants from China and Korea who were forced to fight for survival in remote areas. Practicing martial arts, they developed exceptional skills that brought them to perfection. The fighting style of ninjas was shaped as a system of different techniques of unarmed combat. Training methods had been developing in Japan until the seventeenth century, when master Nagao Kenmotsu introduced the concept of Ninpo-Taijutsu, giving its name to the tradition of using combat techniques to train the body. Development and use of the human body’s abilities was the corner-stone of Ninpo-Taijutsu. The followers of this training were distinguished by high morals and a willingness to help people.

The lecture will be given by the founder of the Russian ninja school “Kateda Ryu Shinobi” Sergei Trofimov, the holder of the 8th Dan of Kateda Ryu Shinobi, the head of the Kateda Kahn community, and an official representative of the Japanese organizations Nippon Koden Bujutsu Iaido Renmei and Nippon Kobudo Kyokai in Russia.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
15:30–16:30
Place
Garage Auditorium

Temporary ink tattoo workshop

How about a cool kanji tattoo from a Japanese master of calligraphy Kaori Ishijima? Graceful lines accentuate the individuality of the tattoo owner. The tattoos are created with an eyeliner ink (which is absolutely safe for the skin), and can be easily removed.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
16:00–16:45
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Chirimen craft workshop

Chirimen is a traditional Japanese art of making small items out of pieces of silk "chirimen" cloth. These can be traditional dolls, jewelry, toys, handbags, bags, pictures or other objects for home decoration, as well as special items for the tea ceremony—for storing tools and utensils.

The chirimen workshop will be led by Elena Komyagina. Since 1991 she has been studying ikenōbo under Professor Midori Yamada and other Japanese arts and crafts: chirimen, suibokuga ink painting, and tea ceremony.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
16:00–17:30
Place
Garage Atrium

Martial arts demonstration by The Association of Martial Arts Clubs

Battodo teachers from the Association of Martial Arts Clubs will show their mastery of the sword—an edgy and exciting performance for the bravest audience members!

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
16:00–18:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Beauty contest of the summer yukata kimono

To put on a kimono properly is already a hard-enough task, but to walk elegantly wearing this traditional clothing is an art in itself. Come over to J-FEST Summer 2017 to see if the participants of the contest are able to complete all challenges.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
16:30–17:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

The game of Shogi, Japanese chess

Two players, a 9x9 chessboard, forty figures, and inexpressible excitement! In Japan, Shogi is way ahead of other games in its popularity. Some estimate that more than twenty million people play it. This game even has its own day—November 17. A game demonstration will be held at the festival by the members of Shogi Players Community.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
16:30–20:30
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Pottery workshop (a plate)

Japanese ceramics are well known for their elegance and variety of forms and decor. During this workshop with Irina Vershinina, participants will get acquianted with the aesthetic principles of the Japanese art, learn about various styles of Japanese ceramics,  and, of course, discover the process of making it.

Under careful guidance, the attendees will be able to make from clay and decorate a small plate for wagashi, traditional Japanese confections usually served during the tea time.

The workshop does not require any prior training.

REGISTRATION

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
17:00–18:00
Place
Garage Kids' Studio

Lecture “Kawaii in search for Zen. Merging the unmergable in the Japanese post-war art”

Art historianTatiana Bortnik will discuss the development of Japanese postwar art from the 1950s to the present day, its brightest ideas and representatives, focusing on the interaction and contradictions of the Western and Eastern visual language.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
17:00–18:30
Place
Garage Auditorium

Performance of the kendama game master Yusuke Ito

Yusuke Ito is Japan's first professional kendama player. Similar to the Western bilboquet or cup-and-ball, kendama is a traditional Japanese wooden toy that has three cups, a spike, and a ball attached to its handle with a string. Players need to catch the ball into one of the cups or onto the spike—and although it might seem easy, kendama requires a lot of skill!

The spectacular tricks that Yusuke Ito will do during this performance require precision and endurance. Playing kendama since the age of seven, Yusuke Ito made it his profession after he graduated from the university. A ten-time national champion, he continues to invent new and more challenging tricks and takes part in various competitions. He has also set several Guiness World Records for the logest kendama game and the extremely difficult trick of catching a ball attached with a 15-meter string on the spike.

In addition to regular shows, seminars and lectures, Yusuke Ito tours the world, and has performed in the United States, the UK, Singapore, Thailand, China, Denmark, Brunei, Malaysia and Russia.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
17:10–17:30
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Calligraphy demonstration

Master of calligraphy Kaori Ishijima will make a hieroglyphic inscription on a huge piece of paper. Its scale and beauty will amaze everyone! Come see it!

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
17:15–17:45
Place
Garage Atrium

Calligraphy workshop

A thirty-minute class by the master of calligraphy Kaori Ishijima is aimed at everyone who would like to try this exciting art. Open to all: from elementary school children to experienced art lovers!

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
18:00–19:30
Place
Garage Atrium

Traditional Japanese bon odori dance

Bon odori is a traditional Japanese dance with a 600-year-old history. It is usually performed during the festival of Obon held in July and August. The bon odori dance, which is performed in colorful kimonos by the light of lanterns, will immerse visitors into the unique atmosphere of an authentic Japanese summer celebration.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
18:30–19:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Martial arts master class by The Association of Martial Arts Clubs

Experienced teachers from The Association of Martial Arts Clubs will share their knowledge and skill with the guests at the festival. The program includes aikido, karate-do, daitō-ryū, kyūdō, kendo, Iaido, jōdō, and tenshin shōden katori shintō-ryū.

REGISTRATION

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
18:00–20:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

Silk screen printing workshop  

Participants will become familiar with silk and regular screen printing techniques and will create their own prints based on ukiyo-e engravings.

REGISTRATION

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
18:40–20:40
Place
Garage Kids' Studio

“Cardboardia” parade

Creatures from the Japanese mythology, created during theMonster transformations with Cardbordia personages” workshop, will appear in front of the audience as a large costume parade marches through Gorky Park.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
19:00-19:30
Place
Garage Screen summer cinema

Screening of Award-winning works from Japan Media Arts Festival  

The annual Japan Media Arts Festival incorporates a diverse range of contemporary visual practices, from animation and comics to media art and games. The screening of award-winning short films, organized by the Agency for Cultural Affairs of Ministry Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan, showcases an overview of the newest trends in media-art, focusing on the works of a new generation.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
19:00–20:00
Place
Garage Auditorium

Beauty contest of the summer yukata kimono, winner announcement

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
19:50–20:00
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum

ASKA-GUMI drum show

Over the twenty-seven years of their existence, the Japanese drum show ASKA-GUMI have gained great popularity around the world. Each show is as intricate as a theatre play with fascinating decorations, lighting, and impressive costumes. The action itself combines the power of drum rhythm with the beauty of human movement.

Date
Saturday, July 15
Time
20:00-20:30
Place
Garage Square in front of the Museum