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Screenings

16 June – 9 August 2015

Description

SCREENINGS

June 13 – August 9, 2015

Open daily, 12:00 – 21:00

Garage Auditorium

Free admission

All films are shown in English or in Russian with English subtitles.

 

In June and July Garage Museum of Contemporary Art will be showing a programme of short films in its Auditorium. Along with a short about the museum made by Kunhardt Films famous for their documentaries on Lincoln and Nixon, Garage will screen Yayoi Kusama’s experimental Self-Obliteration (1967), and a series of 30-minute video interviews with artists including Erik Bulatov, Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid, Vladimir Yankilevsky, Ernst Neizvestny, Yury Zlotnikov, Francisco Infante, Viktor Pivovarov and Dmitri Prigov. The interviews made in the early 2000s by Nina Zaretskaya will accompany The Family Tree of Russian Contemporary Art project. 

 

12:00 – 16:00 From the documentary series Portraits of Artists (2001), Russia.

Directed by Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’ each: Erik Bulatov, Vitaly Komar

and Alexander Melamid, Vladimir Yankilevsky, Ernst Neizvestny.

 

All films are from the Garage Archive Collection (Nina Zaretskaya archive).

 

From the documentary series Portraits of Artists (2001), Russia.

Directed by Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’:Erik Bulatov. 

 

Erik Bulatov defines his artistic task as “scrutinizing the sore spots.” Often associated with Moscow Conceptualism, he has, however, created his own kind of conceptual art incorporating text and image. 

 

From the documentary series Portraits of Artists (2001), Russia.

Directed by Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’: Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid.

 

Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid, who founded the Sots Art movement in 1972, have become iconic representatives of Soviet underground art. They were the central figures in the circle of artists that formed around them in the 1970s, and worked together for 30 years. 

 

From the documentary series Portraits of Artists (2001), Russia.

Directed by Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’: Vladimir Yankilevsky.

 

Vladimir Yankilevsky attended the famous workshop of Ely Bielutin and took part in the 1962 exhibition at the Moscow Manege. Like many other underground artists, he also worked in illustration. Always interested in the question of form, in the 1960s Yankilevsky started making polyptychs, the best known of which are Nuclear Power Plant and Triptych No.2 (Two Beginnings)

 

From the documentary series Portraits of Artists (2001), Russia.

Directed by Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’: Ernst Neizvestny.

 

Ernst Neizvestny was known as the first Russian underground sculptor. In over three decades of working outside of the state-sanctioned art system he created more than 800 works, but sold only a few of them. After his infamous confrontation with Nikita Khrushchev at the 1962 exhibition at the Moscow Manege, he became a living manifesto of nonconformist art. He did get to design Khruschchev’s tomb, however, which remains one of his most famous works. 

 

From the documentary series Contemporary Art Classics (2002), Russia.

Directed by Lyudmila Sukach. Author, Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’ each:

Dmitry Prigov, Yury Zlotnikov. Directed by Vadim Fomenko. Author,

Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’ each: Viktor Pivovarov, Francisco Infante.

 

All films are from the Garage Archive Collection (Nina Zaretskaya archive).

 

 

From the documentary series Contemporary Art Classics (2002), Russia.

Directed by Lyudmila Sukach. Author, Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’:

Dmitry Prigov.

 

Dmitri Aleksandrovich Prigov called himself an author whose texts “pollute the cultural environment,” and this description caught on. He did not like the term poet, and preferred to define himself as “a writer of texts.” A prolific author, he received international acclaim and was awarded the Pushkin Prize. His works have been translated into many languages. 

 

From the documentary series Contemporary Art Classics (2002), Russia.

Directed by Lyudmila Sukach. Author, Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’ :Yury Zlotnikov.

 

Yury Zlotnikov is one of the few Soviet nonconformist artists to have opted for abstraction. His famous Signals is a series of sheets with microchip-like compositions of circles and rectangles. 

 

From the documentary series Contemporary Art Classics (2002), Russia.

Directed by Vadim Fomenko. Author, Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’: Viktor Pivovarov.

 

Viktor Pivovarov is known as one of the founders of Moscow Conceptualism. In the early 1970s he started incorporating text into his drawings and paintings. Parallel to his main line of work, he illustrated children’s books. Over 50 volumes with his design and illustrations have been published in large editions.  

 

From the documentary series Contemporary Art Classics (2002), Russia.

Directed by Vadim Fomenko. Author, Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’: Francisco Infante.

 

Francisco Infante has been defined as a kinetic artist, romantic conceptualist, and an heir to the Russian avant-garde. Critics analyzing his work draw parallels with the Suprematism of Malevich, Tatlin’s reliefs, or Popova’s abstractions. From the 1960s he has been collaborating with his wife Nonna Goryunova, making abstract compositions in natural environments and then documenting them. 

 

16:00 – 18:00 Kusama’s Self-Obliteration (1967), USA.

Directed by Yayoi Kusama. Duration 24’. 18+

 

Yayoi Kusama's experimental film consists of video footage of her happenings of 1967, and fragments of her installations and paintings. The film received prizes at the Fourth International Experimental Film Competition and the Ann Arbor Film Festival. 

 

18:00 – 21:00 From the documentary series Portraits of Artists (2001), Russia.

Directed by Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’ each: Erik Bulatov, Vitaly Komar

and Alexander Melamid, Vladimir Yankilevsky, Ernst Neizvestny.

 

All films are from the Garage Archive Collection (Nina Zaretskaya archive).

 

From the documentary series Portraits of Artists (2001), Russia.

Directed by Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’:Erik Bulatov. 

 

Erik Bulatov defines his artistic task as “scrutinizing the sore spots.” Often associated with Moscow Conceptualism, he has, however, created his own kind of conceptual art incorporating text and image. 

 

From the documentary series Portraits of Artists (2001), Russia.

Directed by Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’: Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid.

 

Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid, who founded the Sots Art movement in 1972, have become iconic representatives of Soviet underground art. They were the central figures in the circle of artists that formed around them in the 1970s, and worked together for 30 years. 

 

From the documentary series Portraits of Artists (2001), Russia.

Directed by Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’: Vladimir Yankilevsky.

 

Vladimir Yankilevsky attended the famous workshop of Ely Bielutin and took part in the 1962 exhibition at the Moscow Manege. Like many other underground artists, he also worked in illustration. Always interested in the question of form, in the 1960s Yankilevsky started making polyptychs, the best known of which are Nuclear Power Plant and Triptych No.2 (Two Beginnings)

 

 

 

 

 

From the documentary series Portraits of Artists (2001), Russia.

Directed by Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’: Ernst Neizvestny.

 

Ernst Neizvestny was known as the first Russian underground sculptor. In over three decades of working outside of the state-sanctioned art system he created more than 800 works, but sold only a few of them. After his infamous confrontation with Nikita Khrushchev at the 1962 exhibition at the Moscow Manege, he became a living manifesto of nonconformist art. He did get to design Khruschchev’s tomb, however, which remains one of his most famous works. 

 

From the documentary series Contemporary Art Classics (2002), Russia.

Directed by Lyudmila Sukach. Author, Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’ each:

Dmitry Prigov, Yury Zlotnikov.

 

All films are from the Garage Archive Collection (Nina Zaretskaya archive).

 

From the documentary series Contemporary Art Classics (2002), Russia.

Directed by Lyudmila Sukach. Author, Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’:

Dmitry Prigov.

 

Dmitri Aleksandrovich Prigov called himself an author whose texts “pollute the cultural environment,” and this description caught on. He did not like the term poet, and preferred to define himself as “a writer of texts.” A prolific author, he received international acclaim and was awarded the Pushkin Prize. His works have been translated into many languages. 

 

From the documentary series Contemporary Art Classics (2002), Russia.

Directed by Lyudmila Sukach. Author, Nina Zaretskaya. Duration 26’ :Yury Zlotnikov.

 

Yury Zlotnikov is one of the few Soviet nonconformist artists to have opted for abstraction. His famous Signals is a series of sheets with microchip-like compositions of circles and rectangles. 

 

Each screening begins with a short film about Garage by American filmmakers

Kunhardt Films.

1. Dmitry Prigov. 1982
Photo: George Kiesewalter
Courtesy of the author

2. Victor Pivovarov. 1975
Photo: George Kiesewalter
Courtesy of the author

3. Vladimir Yankilevsky. 1982
Photo: George Kiesewalter
Courtesy of the author

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